Last edited by Kizshura
Thursday, May 7, 2020 | History

4 edition of War chief of the Seminoles found in the catalog.

War chief of the Seminoles

by May Yonge McNeer

  • 44 Want to read
  • 17 Currently reading

Published by Random House in New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Osceola, Seminole chief, 1804-1838 -- Juvenile fiction.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementIllustrated by Lynd Ward.
    SeriesLandmark books,, 50
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsPZ7.M2328 War
    The Physical Object
    Pagination180 p.
    Number of Pages180
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL6153273M
    LC Control Number54006271
    OCLC/WorldCa1265795

    Find a huge variety of new & used Osceola Seminole chief books online including bestsellers & rare titles at the best prices. Shop Osceola Seminole chief books at Alibris.   Osceola led the Seminole war resistance until he was lied to during peace talks and captured in September He died in prison at Fort Moultrie in Charleston, South Carolina from an infection. Micanopy: As the leading chief of the Seminoles who led the tribe during the Second Seminole War, Micanopy fought valiantly and eventually was.

    Celebrated by writers, studied by scholars, he was a charismatic war leader who staunchly resisted the uprooting of the Seminoles by the U.S. government; the garters testify to .   Seminoles, especially refugees from the Creek War and Black Seminoles who feared re-enslavement, feared the move and resisted inclusion with the Creeks. Many Seminole chiefs refused to sign the treaty, leading to the outbreak of the Second Seminole War and Osceola’s fame. Osceola quickly proved to be a talented tactician and capable leader.

    War Chief of the Seminoles by May McNeer: Old Ironsides: The Fighting Constitution by Harry Hansen: The Mississippi Bubble by Thomas B. Costain: Kit Carson and the Wild Frontier by Ralph Moody: Robert E. Lee and the Road of Honor by Hodding Carter: Guadalcanal Diary by Richard Tregaskis: Commodore Perry and the Opening. Chekika was known as the leader of the "Spanish Indians" fighting against the United States during the 2nd Seminole War. Much of the information that we know about him comes from John T. Sprague's "The Florida War." We don't have anything else on him other than his exploits for 18 months during the war.


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War chief of the Seminoles by May Yonge McNeer Download PDF EPUB FB2

The author May McNeer's great grandfather, Dr. Frederick Weedom of St. Augustine, was a personal friend of Osceola (), the War Chief of the Seminole Indians. The author's family owned some personal belongings of Osceola, e.g. War chief of the Seminoles; (Landmark books, 50) [May McNeer, Lynd Ward] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

War chief of the Seminoles; (Landmark books, 50)Author: May McNeer. War Chief of the Seminoles Hardcover – January 1, by May McNeer (Author) See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions.

Price New from Used from Hardcover "Please retry" $ — $ Author: May McNeer. Get this from a library. War chief of the Seminoles. [May McNeer] -- A brief biography of the Seminole leader who fought against President Jackson's decree War chief of the Seminoles book move his people west.

COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle.

Seminole Wars, (–18, –42, –58), three conflicts between the United States and the Seminole Indians of Florida in the period before the American Civil War, that ultimately resulted in the opening of the Seminole’s desirable land for white.

May McNeer is in familiar territory (see her story Up A Crooked River, p. ) as she writes the biography of Osceola who led the Seminoles through the Florida wars and fought for his rights in one of the more unfortunate chapters of our nation's history.

Taking up the story at the point where the treaties were being violated by settlers who wanted Indian land, she recreates. There were four leading chiefs of the Seminole, a Native American tribe that formed in what was then Spanish Florida in present-day United were leaders between the time the tribe organized in the midth century until Micanopy and many Seminole were removed to Indian Territory in the s following the Second Seminole War.

Cowkeeper, Buy a cheap copy of War chief of the Seminoles; (Landmark book. Free shipping over $ Buy a cheap copy of War Chief of the Seminoles book by May McNeer. Free shipping over $ Book.

See all. Item description " War chief of the Seminoles; (Landmark books, 50) by May McNeer Dust jacket in good condition. Shelf and handling wear to cover and binding, with general signs of previous use.

Boards are clean and straight. Slight spine lean. Light acid stains to two pages, where a newspaper was laid-in. Contents are, otherwise. Osceola, (born c. Georgia, U.S.—died JanuCharleston, South Carolina), American Indian leader during the Second Seminole War, which began in when the U.S.

government attempted to force the Seminole off their traditional lands in Florida and into the Indian territory west of the Mississippi River.

Osceola moved from Georgia to Florida, where. A narrow district was temporarily assigned to the Indians as a planting and hunting ground, and on the 14th of August,it was formally announced that the war in Florida was at an end, and Billy Bowlegs was recognized as the head chief of the Seminoles remaining in Florida.

This is the history of a remarkable nation, the only Indian tribe that never officially made peace with the United States.

General Thomas Sidney Jesup admired the Seminoles as adversaries: "We have, at no former period in our history, had to contend with so formidable an enemy. No Seminole proves false to his country, nor has a single instance occurred of a first rate warrior.

In this engaging, well-researched study, historian Hatch (Black Kettle: The Cheyenne Chief Who Sought Peace but Found War) narrates the protracted, if ultimately futile. The Mad Wolf was the second principal war-chief of the Seminoles, and was one of the deputation of seven chiefs appointed to examine the country west of the Mississippi, assigned to the Florida Indians by the treaty of Payne’s Landing, and who reported favor ably; and also one of the sixteen who signed the treaty at Fort Gibson, ratifying.

A major consequence of the Second Seminole War was the deterioration of relations between Seminoles and Black Seminoles. During the conflict, the United States Army initiated a policy, devised by Gen.

Thomas S. Jesup, to divide the two races by offering the maroons their freedom if they surrendered. Wickman, author of the book “Warriors Without War: Seminole Leadership in the Late Twentieth Century,” considers the use of Indian representation distasteful and. One such slave is Calida, who once saved the life of the war chief Panther, and who witnessed her master murder his wife.

Soon, Panther and Calida are deeply in Amid rising tensions in 's Florida, The Seminole Indians retreat into the swamps of the Everglades rather than be /5. There was also the presence of black warriors among the Seminoles who would agitate southerners who were wary of real and potential slave revolt.

Monaco said the war would tarnish the U.S. Army’s reputation at home and abroad. This was sped up after the capture of Seminole chief Osceola under the pretense of a truce.

During the nineteenth century the United States engaged in three wars with the Seminole Indians in Florida: to about ; to ; and to .CHIEF'S NIECE LED SEMINOLES TO FREEDOM The Creek chief wished to avoid war with the U.S.

Army. Peters writes that a few of the Seminoles escaped. Hetherington's book .Facing continued pressure from slavers, raiders, and the U.S.

Government, many Black Seminoles looked to settle elsewhere. Ina tribal war chief called Wildcat led a group of disenfranchised Seminoles, Creeks, and Black Seminoles from their reservations in Indian Territory to Mexico.